Linking with the future

4 11 2007

 

Diary for November 4th, 2011.

It is incredible to recall how back in 2007 the only contact you had with people at church was when you physically saw them once a week at the service. I remember a few keen people would attend a Bible Study, but most limited their experience of ‘community’ to a Sunday morning. Where would we be without Linking Technology today? What I love about Linking Technology is the ability to communicate and connect at any point in the day. I simply write or record a video/audio message and almost instantly my church community receive a copy. Community isn’t achieved through hurriedly summarizing the week over a cup of tea after the service, but about being involved each day. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements




Baby prodigy

30 07 2007

This is an amazing vid of my 6 month old playing piano!!! Check it out Read the rest of this entry »





how true this is…

11 04 2007

Blogging has arrived as a definite method of communicating… in just two and a half months this blog has received some 3,600 views, more than 100 comments and presently has 44 subscribers.

It has become one of the key ways I communicate my thoughts! Which is why the following cartoon is spot on..

 

 

Read the rest of this entry »





Be careful of ‘thwumping’

13 03 2007

funny-car-photo.JPG
Douglas Adams wrote in The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy series that flying was the art of missing the ground; in a similar vein, my early attempts at driving primarily involved missing trees, curbs, wheelie bins and shopping centres. That’s when I could get the car started. My first of many attempts at passing my driving exam involved stalling the car four times before even leaving the examination centre car park. Hardly the start one would hope for. I was surprised my examiner didn’t quietly advise, ‘now just take your hands off the wheel Mr. Brown, and can I humbly suggest this is the last time you grip the wheel for quite awhile. The public aren’t ready for your driving just yet.’

And then it all changed. Read the rest of this entry »